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New trends in HR Management

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New trends in HR Management

Post by nidhi.vashishth on Thu Sep 15, 2016 3:02 pm

I want each one of you to post new trends/innovative work practices related to PMS HR area in general ..

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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by kaushalsoni139 on Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:07 am

The followings are the major trends in performance management system in hr are given below:-
1.Online Performance Management Systems-
As companies transition to online performance management systems, some key components include:
Scalability - deploying on a large scale with solid security
Employee self-service - managers and employees can access systems anytime, anyplace, on-demand
Integration - connectivity with other HR systems.

2.)Increased Automation of Performance Management and HR Functions-
The integration of traditional HR functions has given rise to an increased need to automate them. Connecting these functions at their integration points into clean, close-looped systems, eliminating duplication of data, and streamlining reporting processes is a priority for many organizations.
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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by Julie kumari on Sat Oct 01, 2016 11:16 pm

5 top HR early trends already can be gleaned:
1) Changes to overtime rules – Though the final rules will likely not be announced until early 2017, the proposed rule raising the minimum salary level for white collar exemptions could result in 4.6 million currently exempt employees losing their exemption right away. Another 500,000 to one million currently exempt employees could lose their exempt status over the next 10 years as a result of automatic increases to the salary threshold.
2) Increased need for data and analytics tools –The ability to collect, process and analyze "big data" is becoming a crucial factor in identifying and managing the challenges of business life cycles. Companies that want to gain a competitive edge increasingly need to use analytics to gain data-driven insights into workforce trends and take action to refine recruitment, compensation and other performance incentives to meet employees' evolving goals and interests.
3)Need for integrated workforce management systems – For employers with 50 or more full-time employees or full-time equivalent employees, the Affordable Care Act has transformed what was once an annual enrollment event into a monthly process of tracking and reporting extensive data. To comply with the law, various personnel in Tax, Finance, IT, Legal and HR who never had to share data may now need to partner to help avoid costly penalties. Gathering the required data from multiple systems can present a challenge so it will be become even more important for businesses to consider an integrated human capital management solution.
4)Employee engagement as a priority – Increasingly, organizations are focusing on improving their employee engagement to drive better performance. According to Gallup research, employee engagement is strongly connected to business outcomes essential to an organization's financial success, such as productivity, profitability and customer engagement. Engaged employees drive the innovation, growth and revenue that growing mid sized companies need to thrive. Case in point: An ADP study found that larger mid sized businesses with 151 to 999 employees cited three talent-related reasons among all reasons for a decline in growth: disengaged employees (23 percent), the inability to attract qualified talent (18 percent) and the inability to retain key talent (17 percent).
5) More Millennials – While much has been made of the silver tsunami of retiring Baby Boomers, on the other end of the spectrum is the growth of the Millennial workforce. According to PwC research, Millennials will account for nearly half the global workforce by 2020. In some companies, they already constitute a majority. Organizations that want to attract and retain fresh talent will need to recruit this cohort of digital natives and ensure that their journey through hiring and on boarding is supported through mobile and social platforms.

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Performance Management Trends for 2016

Post by umanglunia on Sun Oct 02, 2016 2:50 pm

Performance Management Trends for 2016
The world of performance management is drastically changing from what it was just a decade ago. Following leaders such as General Electric and Adobe, more companies are choosing to focus on company goals rather than employee metrics. The older, data-based methods of evaluation have proven themselves ineffective. Instead, business leaders will employ several different ideas in 2016. While some companies have already adopted many of these trends, we expect them to become even more widespread as the negative effects of traditional performance management continue to come to light.

Performance Ratings Will Continue to Disappear
Placing employees on a number scale just doesn’t work. It breeds competition and leads to a less productive workforce overall. Instead, more businesses will evaluate their staff by how successful each member is at working toward company goals. In a similar vein, business leaders should resist the temptation to make management decisions based on people analytics, CIO.com said. While this data can provide insight into skill levels, it doesn’t mean much in the way of engagement. Instead, business leaders should focus on increasing employee satisfaction to deliver better long-term results.

Conversations Will Replace Annual Reviews
Many organizations have already realized yearly assessments are an inefficient way of measuring employees. Business.com expects even more to come around in 2016. Annual reviews mean an employee has about one hour of discussion to see how they’re doing, then approximately 364 days to forget everything he or she discussed with management. Frequent conversations, on the other hand, keep any issues discussed at the forefront of your mind and that of your employees. It also allows you to identify any future issues ahead of time and keeps you constantly aware of your staff members’ needs, workload and abilities.

Professional Development Will Rise to the Forefront of Engagement
Millennials, that nuanced generation that seems to elude so many employers, place a heavy emphasis on leadership development, according to a recent Deloitte survey. In fact, 63 percent of workers aged 34 and below from all over the world complain they aren’t being properly trained for commanding positions at work. As a result, these younger staff members are more likely to frequently change jobs, searching for an employer who cares for their professional development.

Indeed, CIO.com expects employee growth opportunities will have a direct correlation to turnover rates. Based on the Deloitte survey, we can assume a company dedicated to educating and advancing its employees will see less of its workforce leaving the building.

Employers Will Focus on Gender Bias
In 2015, several Hollywood actresses brought gender discrepancy to the forefront when they pointed out women were often paid less than their male co-stars, even if the woman’s role was more important to the movie in question. Such bias is echoed throughout the business world and doesn’t stop at pay rates – it continues through the employee chain all the way to feedback.

According to Fortune, women in the tech sector receive an overwhelming amount of critical feedback compared to their male counterparts during performance reviews. In fact, only 13 percent of women surveyed had a review free of criticisms compared to 58 percent of men. What’s more, 71 percent of women were given negative feedback while only 2 percent of men got the same. Business analysts – and, most importantly, female workers – aren’t ignoring these inconsistencies. Business.com expects more managers will focus on providing fair, unbiased comments when evaluating employee performance.

As more companies take on these ideas in 2016, employee satisfaction will rise, and businesses will see less turnover. It’s our hope that every organization will understand the benefits of revised performance management methods and work towards better practices.

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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by akansha gupta on Sun Oct 02, 2016 3:39 pm

New trends in HR are:

1 The employee experience

Employee experience as something that is comprised of three environments: the physical, the cultural and the technological. It’s the organization’s recognition that they must shift from creating a place where they assume people need to show up to creating an environment where people actually want to show up. The employee experience is a symbiotic relationship that not only allows employees to feel more engaged and happy at work but it also allows employees to contribute their best ideas and work efficiently and productively.

2.Data and Analytics

HR is typically not a data intense part of the organization, but all of that is changing. Today, data can come from a variety of sources ranging from performance numbers and attendance to surveys and tracking employee life events. The smart HR teams around the world are staffing up with plenty data, science and analytics professionals to help make sense understand their people better.

3. Shift from Work-Life Balance to Work-Life Integration

Just a few decades ago, the dream for most employees was to achieve the elusive work-life balance. However, the growth of technology has made it so that most employees are almost always accessible which has led to a shift away from separating work life and personal life. In its place is the blurring of the two areas with flexibility to work during non-work hours and take short personal breaks during the traditional workday. Instead of work being a place you go, work is now a thing you do. It has become an integrated part of most employees’ lives and personalities. This means that work-life balance is dead and is being replaced by work-life integration.

4. The Use of Talent Websites
With the rise of globalism, more and more business owners are realizing that real talent is not confined to a specific geographical region. In recognizing this principle, many of these business owners are requiring human resources representatives to make use of international talent sites and forums to find qualified job candidates.

5. Employee engagement and culture as top priority.

The new era of change is expected. Current economic climate demands smarter operational methods of business. The challenge to stay ahead of global demo-graphical shift and growing competition seems to lean towards one common theme, Employee Engagement interconnected to Culture. The fact that Employee Engagement may have not been the center piece historically has a distinctive strategic place in business today. Executives must place Employee Engagement and Culture as their top most priority in 2016. This growing necessity has benefits and those that embrace will be victorious. Secondary to this theme is Leadership, having the right people that know how to lead teams, inspiring them on a journey to success and on the way creating an exemplary brand.

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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by Yamini Agarwal on Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:57 pm


Global trends in HR
2. Back to the office!
A couple of years ago I visited the Microsoft Office in The Netherlands. This office was state-of-the art, and an example for many. A Starbucks look-alike on the ground floor, and a variety of work spaces for different purposes. Nobody had a personal office. The advice to employees was: only come to the office when you have to meet other people. What we see today, at start-ups but also at established companies as Google, is a different practice. The credo is: please come to the office! Working at home can be lonely, and we want to keep our people closely together. Working in an agile way is a lot easier if you do not have to organize meetings. Lunch and sometime breakfast are offered, and of course on many days there are attractive activities for the staff. Big corporates are moving some of their team into start-up eco systems, to connect and to learn from the young entrepreneurs.
Read: What is your office maturity level?
3. HR goes soft on performance ratings
In 2015 some big organizations proudly announced that they were reforming their performance management processes. Deloitte started a very nice marketing campaign with the article “Reinventing Performance Management” in HBR of April 2015. Accenture and others followed, see for example: “Accenture dumped performance reviews, here is why”.
I have very mixed feelings about this trend. Yes, the frequency of feedback should be a lot higher that once per year. Yes, nobody benefits from a patronizing and unequal approach. Yes, assigning people a crude performance rating is not very helpful. But: measuring performance is very important, and the redesign or abolishment of performance management should not mean that one stops with measuring performance as well. Hopefully Performance Consulting will emerge as a trend in 2016.
Read: HR: don’t kill performance measurement!
4. Individualisation
Treating employees as individuals and not as part of a group or segment will be more visible as a trend in 2016. The way organizations deal with employees is still far behind the way organizations deal with clients, but there is movement. HR can learn a lot from marketing.
Today most organizations still segment in simple ways. Young versus old, Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z, Managers and non-managers and so on. Many untested assumptions are used to design policies and career tracks. “Gen Y wants more work-life balance”. “People above 55 want to slow down”. With big data analysis and with sophisticated algorithms, it has become easier to detect and predict individual preferences of employees, and organizations can act on the insights with tailored programs and interventions.
Read: HR Trends: People Analytics made easy
5. Talent everywhere
Slowly talent management gets a broader scope. Still in many organizations the focus is narrow, on the talent pool inside the organization. “How can we engage and retain our talent?”. The talent pool is broader. More and more talent does not want to be employed by (big) organizations. They are self-employed, and are interested if you can offer a challenging opportunity. Others prefer to work for start-ups. The trend: connecting to talent outside the organization, and design new talent development programs that are also beneficial for these groups. This can be done directly, or through intermediaries.
Read: 10 Talent Management Trends for 2015, HR Trends: Talent Everywhere, From War for Talent to Abundance of Talent
6. Artificial intelligence
Artificial Intelligence is growing up and also entering the HR arena. 2016 will probably not be the year of ‘Machine Learning’, but the developments are going fast. Example: Personality Insights, powered by IBM Watson. Feed the machine with text written by the person you want to analyse, and Personality Insights gives you a sound personality profile within seconds.
Read: HR Trends: Analysing text with artificial intelligence
7. Detecting and selecting the best
The trend setters are looking for ways to measure real performance, in order to be able to detect hyper performers. When performance can be measured and connected to individuals, top performers seem to perform 5-10x better than average. Performance measurement is an enormous opportunity for HR. If HR can find ways to measure real performance, and can improve the detection of potential top performers, the business impact can be big.
Read: HR, don’t kill performance measurement, The myth of the Bell curve: look for the hyper-performers
8. Moving away from Big systems
Big global companies can afford to invest in big expensive core HR information systems. Even these big companies are struggling to implement at a speed that is necessary to follow the changes in the organization, and are struggling to deliver on the high expectations that were set at the time of the investment decision. Other organizations are reviewing if it is wise to invest in big systems. They might be better of to select best-of-breed solutions in different areas, and to find a solution that enables HR reporting and people analytics using the available data out of the different systems. There are many clever solutions on the market. Focused applicant tracking, onboarding, performance management and online training SAAS solutions. And neat and innovative HR reporting and people analytics solutions (as Crunchr).
Read: How to start with People Analytics?
9. Rewards: less external benchmarking
Some weak signals from the executive compensation front. External benchmarking seems to become less popular. Responsible companies with strong Boards dare to look more at the internal differences. Does it make sense for the CEO to earn 5x-10x-20x more than people in her organization two layers down, even if it is justified by the external benchmark? Is the top team really so money driven that they will leave if the Board decides not to follow the market? 2016 will not show major shifts, but it is worthwhile to follow the executive compensation developments.
Read: Why is the market often leading when it comes to packages?
10. Maturing of people analytics
People Analytics is maturing. Last year many HR teams were making the first steps. We saw that some teams lack credibility with their top management, and have some difficulty to get funding to accelerate people analytics. Data analytic capabilities are scarce, even more so when you are looking for people with the necessary analytical capabilities who also have some HR domain knowledge. Sharing capabilities with other functions (marketing, IT) can be a solution. Learning a data analyst something about HR can be easier that learning an HR professional about data analysis.
Read: How to start with People Analytics?
11. Keeping it simple
HR has a tendency to make things too complicated. The trend is to make life simpler. Focus on the most urgent business needs, keep the HR team small and beware of the “Not Invented Here” syndrome. The trend setters are leading the way, and they are showing that HR can have a big impact when they focus on simple solutions with high impact.

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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by Mandeep Kaur on Tue Oct 04, 2016 8:12 pm

Trend #1: Have Quality Conversations
Annual performance evaluations don’t work. Quality-Conversations.jpgEmployees need constant feedback, and the “conversation proclamation” is the shining light at the end of the performance management tunnel. According to researchers at the NeuroLeadership Institute, most companies choose one of two options.

The first option is a highly structured conversation regarding employee performance. The HR department can identify a few topics to be discussed and provide guidance on how to discuss them. The second option is a guided conversation, where managers provide a general framework, and the conversation focuses on goals and progress within an employee’s role. Both options work to prime people (both employees and managers) to induce a growth mindset, improving reception of feedback and collaboration.

Companies such as ConAgra, GAP, Intel, Juniper Networks, Sears, and Adobe have begun the shift to a sophisticated approach featuring in-depth conversations as a focal point. According to Neuroscientist David Rock, more than 88 percent of Juniper Networks participants reported that their conversations were “helpful” or “very helpful.”

Trend #2: Renounce Salary Ties
Generally performance evaluations are tied to salaries or hourly wages. This makes the performance review process very delicate. Managers will want to discuss performance needs and improvements, while employees are focused on small issues like career advancement and compensation. This puts the parties at odds with one another and the discussion suffers. To prevent these issues, many companies are separating their compensation discussions and performance evaluations. By keeping the conversations separate and ongoing, managers can alleviate employee anxiety and promptly respond to any complaints or concerns.

Trend #3: Utilize Peer and Self Evaluations
One of the most effective ways to get subjective feedback on an employee’s performance is through self and peer evaluation. In the case of Google, a company that has no managerial evaluation of employees, self assessment and peer reviews are the frameworks for its performance management strategy. Also joining in is Microsoft, which has completely abandoned traditional performance tactics and instead focuses on leveraging peers and emphasizing continual learning and growth. This system helps managers assess strengths and weaknesses to make decisions regarding promotions and raises. It also provides an opportunity for employees to think introspectively about their roles in the workplace.

Trend #4: Implement The In or Out Rating
As organizations continue to rid themselves of numerical ranking systems, one rating has remained in some companies’ performance management philosophies. The “In or Out” rating is a determination of an employee’s cultural fit with the company. Rather than assessing someone’s problem areas or worth, it answers the question of “Should you stay here?” At Juniper, employees are rated as a “J-Player” or a “Non-J Player.” In Juniper Network’s experience with the “In or Out” rating, more than 80 percent of the people rated as “Non-J Players” opted to leave the company on their own. These employees understood that they would never succeed in their current role.

Trend #5: Onward, to the Digital Future
To minimize the amount of time wasted on paperwork and niceties, a lot of companies are looking toward the digital future for answers. Performance management tools alleviate a large amount of the work involved with performance evaluations. They allow for constant feedback, conversations, and performance tied to goals and recognition—all in real-time.

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Re: New trends in HR Management

Post by tejveerkaur on Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:44 pm

Interview trends-Google recruiter Martha Josephson implored Bock, who had done stints at firms like GE and McKinsey & Co., not to wear a suit to his interview. No one wears suits in these companies as observed. The company tend to eventually make their way to its perks, like free gourmet food and fitness classes, the typical envy-inducing stuff of similarly sized tech names in the Valley. GOOGLE GIVES SPECIAL FREEDOM TO ITS EMPLOYEES. Google uses science to figure out what makes teams work

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